Love in the Digital Age ~ Reviewer Rated

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5

Source: Adult Industry News

By: Rich Moreland


Love in the Digital Age

“Love in the Digital Age” is a New Sensations release that stars Gia Paige, Kenna James, Mona Wales, Logan Pierce, Tyler Nixon, Small Hands, and Marcus London. The writer/director is Jacky St. James with Eddie Powell serving as director of photography.

The filmmaking team of Jacky St. James and Eddie Powell is together again in a romantic comedy that offers up a bit of social commentary. The theme that runs throughout the narrative is finding love in our social media age. Of course, anything having to do with romance has it’s ups and downs and this film doesn’t forget that.

The premise is simple and complex at the same time. Sara (Gia Paige) breaks up with her boyfriend (Tyler Nixon) and moves in with her cousin Lizzie (Kenna James). Lizzie’s mom Janine (Mona Wales) challenges the girls to give up their cell phones and find romance the old-fashioned way. They agree and in return insist that Janine get a mobile phone and use dating apps to find a lover.

From there the action gets interesting. Though the story of three romances is worth the price of the DVD, Jacky St. James’ views on our social media culture add to its value. Are we so psychologically and emotionally addicted to our phones that we miss what is happening around us, she asks?

Here are some of the scenarios Jacky uses to explore that question.

The phoneless Lizzie and Sara head over to happy hour where the crowd reminds Lizzie of zombies. The patrons are engrossed in their phones at the expense of socializing with each other. Later, Sara is forced to communicate with a love interest Griff (Logan Pierce) through snail mail (an early version of texting). To actually talk with him, she discovers the marvels of old-fashioned technology: the landline.

In the meantime, Lizzie meets Jeremy (Small Hands) who dislikes technology while mom Janine creates a connection with a potential lover Mark (Marcus London) via a dating app. The old learn something new.

Of course, social media can lead to deception and torpedo relationships. Sara discovers her ex-boyfriend’s sexist pics of her posted without her permission. If that’s not enough, she eventually must deal with her new guy’s lack of honesty concerning his connection to technology. In the meantime, Janine stalks Mark through checking his online pages.

From there the sex scenes come to life as each woman plays her carnal hand. Sara has two scenes; one with Will, her first boyfriend, and later with Griff. Lizzie does the dirty with Jeremy at his place and eventually Janine and Mark hook up. By the way, Mona Wales’ scene is worth a look if you’re a squirting fan.

“Love in the Digital Age” is not a gonzo film so the rough sex typical of all-sex shoots is missing. Each scene features a lengthy cowgirl since that position maximizes female pleasure. There’s lots of kissing and male-on-female oral. What isn’t around is deep throating, facials, multiple penetrations and genital close-ups. This is a film for women and couples, so female pleasure and emotion is emphasized.

Eddie Powell and Paul Woodcrest reflect a pro-woman feel in their camera work. Facial expressions are highlighted as the way men and women communicate during sex. In shooting the bodies in action, the male is as much a part of the scene as his female counterpart. In a Jacky St. James film, the guys are more than “dicks in the corner” with no larger reality.

Camera movement is vital in filming the Eddie Powell way. His shooting mimics the passion lovers feel when they are intimately engaged. It’s a talent that is special in shooting porn and invites the viewer to become part of the on-screen relationships.

Finally, Jacky believes that her cast must be able to take direction and get into their characters. It matters little to her if her hires are well-known porn names. It’s their ability to demonstrate the nuances of acting and dialogue delivery, or their willingness to learn if they don’t, that secures their roles.

All-in-all, the Jacky St. James way makes for top-of-the-line romances and secures for “Love in the Digital Age” a five out five stars.

Reviewer Rating: Power On!

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